Author Archive

Looking for FREE activities for your children? This free drop-in workshop on Saturday, March 26, 2011 from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm focuses on storytelling for young students and includes opportunities for students to verbally tell stories or tell a story through pictures as well as write a story down. Held at the Tri-State Community School for the Arts, 115 Baltimore Street, Cumberland, MD, and geared toward elementary school children up to age 16, this workshop will also be relevant for Pre-K and pre-reading/writing students. Story prompts, pencils, crayons, collage materials, and other things to make a story will be on-hand for children to create their own story. No registration is necessary, simply drop-in and create!

The workshop will be taught by our creative writing instructor, Tiffany A. Turbin Santos, who has years of experience in working with children of all ages in a variety of settings. Currently, she is studying poetry for an MFA degree at Carlow University in Pittsburgh and has had work published in several undergraduate literary journals and the Backbone Mountain Review, a regional literary journal. She also teaches developmental writing at Potomac State College. For more information, visit her website: www.cranberryjade.com.

A variety of writing and art classes are offered at Tri-State Community School for the Arts. Registration for summer and fall classes is available on-line NOW at www.tristatearts.com or call (301) 876-1562 for more information.

Advertisements

Literature has a profound affect on our lives whether we realize it or not. Reading literature can help us to understand the lives of others as well as our own in new and amazing ways. Furthermore, a community of readers is also a wonderful way to build a sense of connection and create a safe space for discussion and expression.

One of the areas newest reading groups is the Queer Book Group. Focusing on LGBTQI authors, this group will be reading fiction, non-fiction, and poetry that is both mainstream and lesser known. Everyone is welcome! The group plans to meet on the third Thursdays of the month, and is currently meeting at the Frostburg Center for Creative Writing at 22 East Main Street, Frostburg, Maryland.

The next meeting will take place on March 17, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. The selection is Orlando: A Biography by Virginia Woolf, a roman à clef (based on real people) novel published in 1928. Food and drink will be on-hand! Haven’t read the book? No problem, you are welcome!

Also please bring recommendations for LGBTQI authors. We discussed possible choices for upcoming months at the first meeting in September (for instance James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room and Rita Mae Brown’s Ruby Fruit Jungle), but the group is open to suggestions! The group is facilitated by Tiffany A. Turbin Santos.

Please visit the groups Facebook page or send an email for more information to LGBTQreading@groups.facebook.com.

Literature has a profound affect on our lives whether we realize it or not. Reading literature can help us to understand the lives of others as well as our own in new and amazing ways. Furthermore, a community of readers is also a wonderful way to build a sense of connection and create a safe space for discussion and expression.

One of the areas newest reading groups is the Queer Reading Group. Focusing on LGBTQI authors, this group will be reading fiction, non-fiction, and poetry that is both mainstream and lesser known. Everyone is welcome to attend as the group is open to the community! The group plans to meet on the third Thursdays of the month, and is currently meeting at the Frostburg Center for Creative Writing at 22 East Main Street, Frostburg, Maryland.

The next meeting will take place on October 21, 2010 at 7:30 p.m. The selection is Love, Death, and the Changing of the Seasons by Marilyn Hacker, a book of poetry. Food and drink will be on-hand! Haven’t read the book? No problem, you are welcome! The November gathering will be on the 18th at the same time and location.

Also please bring recommendations for LGBTQI authors. We discussed possible choices for upcoming months at the first meeting in September (for instance Perry Moore’s Hero, Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room, and Rita Mae Brown’s Ruby Fruit Jungle), but the group is open to suggestions! The group is facilitated by Tiffany A. Turbin Santos.

Please visit the groups Facebook page or send an email for more information to LGBTQreading@groups.facebook.com.

Shopping around a manuscript? You might want to look close to home. CityLit Press is a new imprint of the Baltimore based CityLit Project. The small press is especially looking for titles by Maryland authors.

According to the website, “The mission of CityLit Press is to publish books that, because of literary quality or regional focus, would not likely find a home with larger publishers. The press advances the organization’s mission to connect a community of readers and writers.”

CityLit Press is looking to forge a new publishing model that incorporates “new print and digital ways of delivering literature to readers, a wiser economic foundation, and modern marketing strategies,” which rests firmly on “true partnerships” with authors. Additionally, the press sponsors two poetry chapbook contests.

As an imprint of the CityLit Project, the CityLit Press is one part of fulfilling the Project’s mission statement: “CityLit Project nurtures the culture of literature in Baltimore and throughout Maryland…[and] focuses our mission to elevate enthusiasm for literary arts in the Baltimore metropolitan region, for the benefit of Maryland readers and writers; build and connect a community of avid readers and writers, through public events and publicity, workshops, web site, publishing, and collaboration; [and] open opportunities for young people and diverse audiences to embrace the literary arts.”

Check out the website for ways to become involved or for submission guidelines!

As featured in Poets & Writers Magazine‘s News and Trends, open-air publishing is growing in popularity as “innovative independent publishers continue to find ways to thread literature into the social fabric.”

What is open-air publishing? From poets passing out poems on street corners to public bathroom stall tape-ups, this form of publishing is all about “bringing literature into people’s daily lives.”

Enter Broadsided, the creation of Elizabeth Bradfield and begun in 2005. E-submissions of short prose and poetry are paired with unique artist responses in a monthly PDF, which can be printed and distributed by anyone. Become a “vector” by posting Broadsided on your office door or take some on vacation this summer to leave a subversive trail of literature in unexpected places.

poem by Jennifer Perrine art by Julie Evanoff

Submit your own poems and prose via e-mail and be sure to check out the website for writing guidelines, a vector map, and more!